Comprehension worksheets on the events of World War I. Read More

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Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial

World War I

It is now over 100 years since the onset of World War One, and we have an excellent collection of information and resources about the war.

We have a series of comprehension worksheets on how and why the war started, Lord Kitchener and the Pals Battalions. Perhaps the most interesting of these is the Pals Battalions worksheet. This describes how groups of pals enrolled to fight at the beginning of the war. They were groups of friends, workmates, or even school or university mates who signed up together so that they could fight shoulder to shoulder with their friends. The reality was rather different as many battalions were destroyed and villages and towns lost vast numbers of their young men.

Our latest sets of comprehensions take a closer look at trench warfare on the Western Front and include details of the Christmas truce, including football in no-man’s land. The main theme, however, is the terrible conflict around the town of Ypres, including the three main battles.

The first battle occurred in 1914 as trenches were dug around the town in an attempt to gain control of the vital coastal ports.

The second battle of Ypres took place in 1915 and was made up of six smaller engagements. It was during this battle that poison gas was first used on a large scale. The chlorine gas killed many on both sides as it relied on the wind to carry it.

The third battle was in 1917 when the Allies bombarded the German trenches for ten days, using 3000 guns. However, the only winner was the mud, created by the bombardment and bad weather. Many men and horses drowned in the swamp that had been created.

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