Planning and writing about personal experiences for younger children. Read More

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Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial
Register for a free trial and print five sets of worksheets. Get a Free Trial

Writing about personal experiences

It is really important that young children develop positive attitudes towards writing and one of the best ways to do this is to ask them to write about their personal experiences. Our latest set of English worksheets provide some great ideas for writing narratives about personal experiences with topics such as, ‘The best thing I have made’, ‘My best holiday’, ‘People who help me’ and ‘My classroom’; all experiences that young children are very familiar with.

The worksheets also help with the writing process, including thinking out loud, collecting ideas, writing down key ideas and/or key words as well as drafting and completing the final piece of writing. Each set of worksheets provides a planning page to assist the drafting process and a writing page for the final version.

Of course there is a lot more to successful writing than providing good ideas and structure and we don’t suggest that children should sit down on their own and come up with the finished product without help. A key part of writing is to talk about ideas, saying out loud what it is they are thinking about, even to act out part, or all, of the story.

More than anything children need to read and listen to whole books which develop their vocabulary and give an understanding of how a piece of narrative writing is structured. Also, don’t forget to spend a little time in proof reading and evaluating writing; most children are very reluctant to read through their own work once they think it has been finished and it can easily become a tedious chore for them. A good way to do this is to ask them to read their writing aloud. The latest programme of Study for Year 2 states that this should be done with, ‘appropriate intonation’ to make the meaning clear.

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